No Bullshit

Deep, true, moving and essential things and dumb stuff because it's a hard world - you gotta laugh sometimes.

"Just the fact that people seem to be getting dumber and dumber, y’know, I mean, we have all this amazing technology, and yet computers have turned into, basically, four figure wank machines. The internet was supposed to set us free, democratise us, but all it’s really given us is Howard Dean’s aborted candidacy and 24-hour access a day to kiddie porn. People… they don’t write any more. They blog. Instead of talking, they text. No punctuation, no grammer. L-O-L this and L-M-F-A-O that. It just seems to me that it’s just a bunch of stupid people pseudo-communicating with a bunch of other stupid people, in a protolanguage that resembles more what cavemen used to speak than the King’s English."

ipodwarrior:

- Hank Moody, Muthafuckaaaaaa

yovisto:

On January 06, 1912, German geologist Alfred Wegener presented his theory of continental drift for the first time in public at a meeting of the Geological Society (‘Geologische Vereinigung’) at Senckenberg Museum in Frankfurt, Germany.
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yovisto:

On January 06, 1912, German geologist Alfred Wegener presented his theory of continental drift for the first time in public at a meeting of the Geological Society (‘Geologische Vereinigung’) at Senckenberg Museum in Frankfurt, Germany.

[Read More]

amnhnyc:

New research suggests that dinosaurs fell victim to a “perfect storm” of events.
Dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in time, according to new research conducted in part by the American Museum of Natural History. The study, published today in Biological Reviews, builds a new narrative of the prehistoric creatures’ demise some 66 million years ago when a six-mile- (10-kilometer-) wide asteroid struck what is now Mexico.
Read the full story. 

amnhnyc:

New research suggests that dinosaurs fell victim to a “perfect storm” of events.

Dinosaurs might have survived the asteroid strike that wiped them out if it had taken place slightly earlier or later in time, according to new research conducted in part by the American Museum of Natural History. The study, published today in Biological Reviews, builds a new narrative of the prehistoric creatures’ demise some 66 million years ago when a six-mile- (10-kilometer-) wide asteroid struck what is now Mexico.

Read the full story